Crescent Hotels & Resorts Adds Hyatt Place/Hyatt House Dual Property in East Moline

USA, East Moline, Illinois. June 30, 2020

The Hyatt Place East Moline/Quad Cities and the Hyatt House East Moline/Quad Cities are now being managed by Crescent Hotels & Resorts. Crescent, based in Fairfax, Virginia is a nationally recognized operator of major hotels and resorts throughout the United States and Canada.

The 233-room dual-branded hotel, offers free parking for guests, a free shuttle, and is minutes from the Tax Slayer Center, John Deere Harvester Works, Deere & Company World Headquarters and the John Deere Pavilion. Many guest rooms feature Mississippi River views, and with riverfront access, guests can hike, bike or stroll the Great River Trail just outside the hotel's doorstep.

Hyatt's approach to wellbeing is focused on three landmarks: FEEL, FUEL and FUNCTION.

Thoughtfully designed rooms with dedicated areas to work, sleep and play; fluid social spaces to seamlessly transition from work to relaxation; and dermatologist designed products to promote skin and hair health support how guests feel. Breakfast made of natural ingredients, like cage-free eggs and whole fruit; blackout curtains to enable a good night's sleep; and the Hyatt exclusive mattress developed for comfort support how guests fuel. A fitness center with cardio equipment and strength-training machines, and refreshing pool perfect for swimming laps support how guests function.

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Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.