Sonnenblick-Eichner Company Arranges $50 Million Loan for Provenance Hotels to Refinance Hotel Theodore in Seattle, WA

USA, Beverly Hills, California. July 26, 2018

Sonnenblick-Eichner Company has arranged $50 million of interim first mortgage financing to refinance Hotel Theodore, a 20-story, 153-room, full-service, luxury boutique hotel located at the corner of 7th Avenue and Pine Street, in the heart of downtown Seattle, Washington, one block west of the Washington State Convention Center.

The floating-rate loan was sized to a debt yield of less than 6% and priced over LIBOR at a spread in the mid-300s. Loan proceeds are being used to refinance the existing acquisition and renovation loan as well as provide a return of equity to the borrower, Portland, OR-based Provenance Hotels.

In November of 2017, Provenance completed an extensive $32 million renovation that included updating the guestrooms, bathrooms, meeting rooms, public spaces, and a build-out of the ground floor restaurant space. Amenities include Rider, an upscale restaurant and bar, a coffee shop, approximately 4,172 square feet of state-of-the-art meeting space and a fitness center.

"Given the excellent sponsorship and location, and that Seattle is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic gateway cities in the U.S., we had 14 competitive loan quotes from institutional lenders," said Sonnenblick-Eichner Company Principal Elliot Eichner. "The loan refinances an existing financing that was also arranged by Sonnenblick-Eichner Company," added Sonnenblick-Eichner Principal Patrick Brown.


Tags: Sonnenblick, sonnenblick-eichner, Provenance, finance, real estate, hotel, hotels, CRE, mortgage, loan, lending, Seattle, debt

About Sonnenblick-Eichner Company

About Provenance Hotels

Media Contact:

Bruce Beck
President
DB&R
T: 805-777-7971
E: bruce@dbrpr.com
W: http://www.dbrpr.com

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