A Path Towards a More Sustainable and Efficient Energy Management System

By James Gieselman Principal, Emeritus Consulting, LLC | December 18, 2016

Start discussing a technical topic and watch as people's eyes glaze over, even if those people are fully aware that it's something they should be paying attention to. Embarking on a path toward a more sustainable and energy efficient hotel operation qualifies as one of these 'glazed' subjects, so to eliminate any possibility of eyelid fatigue, let's talk about this extremely important issue in terms of something just a bit more fun - golf.

A Golf Analogy

Tired of listening to your old college buddies boast about how well they're scoring on the course, you finally decide to up your game. All indications are that they're tearing it up every time they play, so the first thing you must do is to find out just how good your friends actually are. Establishing their handicaps in the range of 15 to 23, this still doesn't give you – the sans-handicap learner – an accurate barometer for whether they are better than you or not. Maybe before buying that new $1,400 set of clubs everyone said you had to have, it might be smart to wait and see where you stand.

So, you go out and establish your handicap over the next several weeks. Lo and behold, yours turns out to be a 21! Certainly not the best of the group, but not the worst either. Now, though, you're wondering how you can lower that handicap so you become the best of your peers.

You could just go out and play more, but that hasn't proven effective for the last two decades, so why would it work now? No, you need to think this through and have a plan. That's the only sure way to make this happen. Thus, you opt for lessons to help improve your approach.

After finding the right golf professional, you meet him on the driving range. Driving, long irons, chipping and putting – he looks over your whole repertoire. Then he suggests five ways to improve your game substantially such as changing your stance, bigger hip turns, higher follow-through, new grips for your irons and purchasing one of those rescue/hybrid clubs. Pretty simple stuff, and it won't cost you a fortune either.

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Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.