Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Ferrara

Clifford Ferrara

Vice President of Sales & Revenue Management, Chesapeake Hospitality

Clifford Ferrara is the Vice President of Sales and Revenue Management for Chesapeake Hospitality, a leading third-party hotel management company ranked in the top 50 largest independent US operators. His leadership spans more than 30 years, including multiple brands and a wide variety of hotel types, both in a sales and operations capacity. His diverse leadership roles include responsibilities as director of sales, director of marketing, revenue management and as general manager. Mr. Ferrara is a highly effective communicator and enthusiastic leader who can motivate a team to achieve objectives. His energy and personality are well suited to handle multiple tasks and challenges. He thrives on being resourceful and creative in his approach to sales and revenue management in order to achieve determined results. His record of industry accomplishments include a common theme of re-positioning fledgling hotel sales and operations teams, then effectively deploying them to achieve strategic results. Mr. Ferrara successfully revitalized the sales mission and image of the 613 room Adams Mark Charlotte, the city's largest convention hotel, nearly doubling group production during his tenure. As general manager of the Crowne Plaza Houston Downtown he effectively re-organized the sales team and improved operations efficiencies, while creating a culture a success that lead to increased food and beverage sales, improved profitability and better guest satisfaction scores. One of Mr Ferrara's most rewarding accomplishment was his involvement with the opening of the 315-room Crowne Plaza Hollywood Beach in Florida. As general manager, he was able to apply all of his professional skills to overcome the trials of opening a new hotel, developing the Crowne Plaza Hollywood into one of the most accomplished brand franchises. Mr. Ferrara attended Porter-Gaud School in Charleston, South Carolina and earned a B.A. degree in English from Hampden-Sydney College. He enjoys hunting, fishing and boating, while currently residing in Annapolis, Maryland.

Mr. Ferrara can be contacted at 301-474-3307 or cferrara@chesapeakehospitality.com

Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.