Editorial Board   

Ms. Bulls Dixon

Gayle Bulls Dixon

Owner/Founder, Breathe Spa Management Company

As a former Fortune 100 executive, leadership consultant and entrepreneur, Gayle Bulls Dixon's business acumen and wellness philosophy find an uncommon melding in the Breathe Spa concept, which she created in 2002. Already a partner in Dixon Entities, which owns and manages real estate investments including the Daufuskie Island Resort & Breathe Spa off the coast of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, Ms. Dixon was perplexed to find a lack of qualified spa management companies that satisfied her requirements for service, partnership, vision and profitability. Shortly after opening the Breathe Spa at the exclusive Daufuskie Island Resort, Ms. Dixon began receiving requests for spa management assistance from other resort owners. "It became apparent that there was significant interest in the Breathe Spa concept, as well as in a spa management company that focused on both impeccable service and profitability," she says. "I created Breathe Spa Management Company (BSMC), which is a full-service destination spa and spa management company because the market led me to do so. It is successful because I have both the financial and management background to lead the team that I have assembled, consisting of great leaders with direct experience managing upscale spas." Ms. Dixon's professional background includes executive level positions in the U.S., London and Venezuela with international corporations like AT&T, IBM and Qwest. She also founded Learning, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in leadership and corporate reorganizations, in 1996. In addition to the executive roles in BSMC and Dixon Entities, Ms. Dixon presents to and is involved with business and women's organizations, and she recently spoke at the 2004 China-U.S. Women's Leadership Conference in China. She is anticipating the release of her first book in 2005, which examines how women business leaders can best focus their feminine strengths to their advantage in a male-dominated business climate. She also has a television pilot in the works which explores various aspects of increased spirituality. Ms. Dixon received a bachelor's degree in management from California Coast University; a mini-MBA from Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and is a graduate of the Entrepreneur's Program of Southern Methodist University in Dallas. She resides with her husband Bill in the San Francisco Bay area.

Ms. Bulls Dixon can be contacted at 415-789-5224 or gayledixon@dixonentities.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.