Editorial Board   

Mr. Ely

John Ely

Senior Vice President of Marketing, Signature Worldwide

As Signature Worldwide's Senior Vice President of Marketing, John Ely is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating strategic marketing and corporate growth plans. He joined Signature in November 2006 with more than 14 years of industrial and consumer marketing experience. Mr. Ely is an accomplished executive in developing and managing corporate launches for products and services while working for such companies as RFG Associates, A Solar Company, Vanner Inc. and Teledyne MEC. With these companies, he held the leadership roles of project manager, vice president of marketing, product development manager, and senior research and design engineer. Most recently, Mr. Ely worked for Crane Plastics as new market development director where he led such initiatives as designing and facilitating market studies, including consumer preferences, client relations and competitive research. His efforts focused on strategic marketing such as market penetration, and product and service positioning. He also helped author and facilitate training programs for Crane^aEURTMs inside and outside sales teams. Mr. Ely has an associate's degree in electrical engineering, a bachelor's in technical management and a master's in marketing and communications. He is a member of the American Marketing Association and Product Development Management Association. Mr. Ely has also served as a marketing professor at Franklin University in Columbus, Ohio, for several years and is certified as a "Teaching at a Distance" (TAD) online educator. Mr. Ely's extensive experience in steering business strategy, marketing, and developing new products is an invaluable asset when delivering programs to clients and helping Signature Worldwide reach its strategic goals.

Mr. Ely can be contacted at 614-766-5101 or johnely@signatureworldwide.com

Coming up in October 2019...

Revenue Management: Focus On Profit

Revenue Management is still a relatively new profession within hotel operations and as such, it continues to evolve. One significant trend in this area is a shift away from using revenue as the foundation to generate key performance indicators (KPIs) and to instead place the emphasis on profit. Traditionally, revenue managers have relied on total revenue per available room (TrevPAR) and revenue per available room (RevPAR) as the basis of their KPIs. Now, some revenue managers are using gross operating profit per available room (GOPPAR) as their primary KPI. This puts profit at the center of revenue management strategy, and managers are increasingly searching for new ways to increase the profitability of their hotels. Return on Investment is the objective of any hotel investment, so it is only logical that profitability and ROI will be emphasized going forward. Another trend is an expanded focus on direct hotel bookings. Revenue managers know that one way to increase profitability is to steer guests away from online travel agencies (OTAs) and book directly with the hotel. This tactic also reinforces brand identity and loyalty, and encourages repeat business. In addition, it provides a valuable platform to market the hotel directly to the customer, and to upsell room upgrades or other services to them. Another trend for revenue managers involves automation in their software programs. Revenue management systems with automation are far more desirable than those without it. Automating data entry and logistics increases efficiency, allowing managers to spend more time on formulating strategy. As a bonus, an automated system helps with aggregating and interpreting data. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.