Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Childs

Carolyn Childs

Principal, Mytravelresearch.com

Carolyn Childs has spent more than 25 years' helping businesses achieve their goals by using research and other evidence to guide strategy and planning - mainly in the aviation, travel and tourism fields. She has worked in more than 35 countries on every inhabited continent and brings a detailed understanding of customers and how to connect with them. As well as running her own businesses, Ms. Childs has worked for organizations such as the International Air Transport Association, TNS (the world's largest custom research company) and ran the Travel Research Centre for 8 years. Her clients include blue chip names across the industry including Aer Rianta, Tourism Australia, TurEspana (Spanish national tourism organisation), Air New Zealand, Qantas and Emirates. Ms. Childs' passion is making a difference and she does this by making research accessible and business focused. With Bronwyn White, she co-created Domesticate™ (now owned by TNS) - one of the industry's most respected sources of strategic direction for the Australian domestic tourism market. Ms. Childs set up MyTravelResearch.com with Ms. White in 2011 to help fulfill this passion by making the tools, approaches and insights accessible to everyone. Ms. Chiilds is a regular speaker at conferences and writes blogs for Sparksheet (on behalf of TNS) and MyTravelResearch.com. She has written an e-book “Same, same but different: Connecting with Consumers in Emerging Markets” She is a Full Member of the (UK) Market Research Society), contributes to the UNWTO panel of world tourism experts and is a founding board member of the TTRA Asia Pacific Chapter

Ms. Childs can be contacted at 610416213962 or carolyn@mytravelresearch.com

Coming up in September 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.