The Hotel Group Completes Renovation of Crowne Plaza Kansas City Downtown

USA, Seattle, Washington. August 29, 2019

The Hotel Group (THG), a leading national hotel management and investment company, announced today the completion of the Crowne Plaza Kansas City Downtown's transformational renovation.

With newly redesigned public spaces and guestrooms, featuring the innovative WorkLife model, the Crowne Plaza Kansas City Downtown thoughtfully and intentionally provides the best possible guest experience. Geared towards business and pleasure travelers, the hotel effortlessly provides a space perfectly fitting each guest's needs. In addition to a refreshed Grab and Go Market, the hotel unveiled a brand-new dining concept, The Rail Bar & Bites, inspired by the historic local rail industry.

"THG is pleased to unveil our newly transformed Crowne Plaza Kansas City Downtown," stated Douglas Dreher, President and CEO The Hotel Group. "The hotel infuses the perfect blend of Kansas City's downtown ambiance into a modern guest stay through the newly created WorkLife guestrooms, new on-site restaurant, The Rail Bar + Bites, and refreshed lobby coffee shop, Full Steam. We appreciate our long-standing partnership with IHG and look forward to welcoming the community and our guests to our newly enhanced hotel."

The 385-room full-service property features over 14,000 square feet of versatile meeting space, including ten meeting rooms and function spaces ideal for business gatherings, social events, or weddings. The Crowne Plaza's premier location is seated in the heart of Downtown Kansas City, steps away from world-class dining, music, sporting events, and entertainment.

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