Library Archives

 
Mukesh Kumar

Regardless of how technologically driven or popular a hotel brand is, customer service can truly make or break a hospitality experience. While our homes and daily lives can be reliant upon Alexa, hotel experiences still require personal touches and a "ready to serve" experience. What can we do to consistently deliver high customer satisfaction rates? This article takes a deeper dive into a variety of different approaches which hotel management can implement to continually motivate their employees leaving customers feeling positive, satisfied and fulfilled from the overall experience. Read on...

Ed Fuller

Hospitality industry leader Ed Fuller shares his expertise on the importance of hotel safety and security preparedness in today's tumultuous times. The need for hotels, both large and small, to have crisis management and a crisis communications management plan in place at all times has never been more urgent. Hopefully, hotel executives will never need to activate these plans but being prepared is paramount. Additionally, Fuller highlights several news stories that sparked a media relations nightmare for several national brands offering readers insight on how local incidents can become front page news thanks to people's smart phones. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

From things like being up to date on the latest job board or careers site, through finding the time to screen every qualified potential candidate, hiring can be a brutal experience. This is among the chief reasons that the recruiting industry came into being; recruiters can make things easier for hiring managers. But not all roles and situations merit the help of a seasoned hiring professional. In facat, there are a number of circumstances that travel tech and hotel leaders should consider before bringing on a recruiting partner. This article identifies when it is, and when it is not time for hiring help. Read on...

Mark Heymann

A persistent labor shortage means the hospitality industry is facing tough workforce questions: How can a hotel deliver the level of service it promises with a smaller staff? Will tougher competition for workers impact average wage rates in a historically low-paying industry? What solutions, like cross-utilization, can hotels implement now? And what solutions will require larger-scale legal and societal change? Among the more transformational ideas this article will explore are rethinking current minimum shift requirements and looking to nontraditional sources, from retirees to training the formerly incarcerated, for future hospitality work. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Industry-wide, there is recognition and agreement about the pitfalls of hiring the wrong person. Aggressive estimates say that the cost of a poor hire can go as high as $240,000, and the US government says it is 30% of the the (ill-fated) employee's salary. But as we all know, turnover is real, and there is a 100% chance a hotel, hospitality company, TravelTech provider or chain of properties will need to make a new hire. Below are five ways to ensure your next hire is the right hire, every time. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Hiring the right people is hard work, in and of itself. From casting a wide enough net to attract a variety of quality candidates, to getting the ideal hire to accept an offer, there are many pitfalls through the hiring process. There are external elements recruiters and HR leaders in the hospitality industry face that increase the level of difficulty. These include budgetary constraints, brand reputation and location. That's not to say there aren't best practices that will help to overcome these issues and ease the mind of quality candidates, getting them from prospective employee to actual hire. Read on...

Susan Tinnish

Coaching relationships offer a pathway for personal and professional development. Many organizations expect their senior leaders and middle managers to coach their team members toward higher levels of performance, increased job satisfaction, personal growth, and career development. This internal coaching serves as an important employee retention tool as employees see a pathway for their career within the hotel, brand or company. More senior hotel executives can benefit from external business coaching from a professional coach. These relationships support an executive working on goals, strategies, and real-world, real-time issues that arise. This article focuses on the value of external coaching. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

Hiring great people is critical to the success of a hotel or hotel tech company. It takes considerable effort and money to find employees that are the right blend of cultural and experiential fit. But hiring is only one part of the human resources equation. After going to great lengths to find the right employees, it is just as critical to keep them. This article looks at the ways many hotels are building employee engagement to increase retention, focusing on both obvious initiatives (like proper pay) and newer approaches (such as points programs). Read on...

Bernard Ellis

A labor rule was set to go into effect during the final days of the Obama Administration that would have called for almost doubling the minimum salary an employee must earn before he or she becomes exempt from overtime pay. Owing much to pressure from our industry, which would have been significantly affected, the rule was prevented from taking effect by the courts and summarily shelved. For those workers who were affected, especially those who were extended the raise then had it taken away, it was not only breaking news, but heartbreaking news, and made for low morale and heightened distrust. What now? Read on...

Miranda Kitterlin, Ph.D.

Millennials are entering the workplace with the ideology that their tenacity and education would propel their professional career. They are being met, however, with some stark realities. In speaking to numerous millennial hospitality workers, it was apparent that there are some gaps between what they expected from the workplace versus what they are actually experiencing. These gaps are explored, and supplemented with direct quotes from millennial hospitality professionals. The millennial worker is a valuable resource to our industry, especially given the size of this young generation. It is important that industry professionals understand these misconceptions so as to maximize performance. Read on...

Rocco Bova

Talking about Millennials it's been now a hot topic since 10 years. Of course, we all know how relevant it is, being the majority of today's workforce and tomorrow's leaders. What's most important is the fact that every industry is gearing up towards them, from travel to technology and from education to retail. Of course the reason is simple, Millennials are and will be the next BIG business opportunity. Here are some tips about managing Millennials in the (hospitality) workplace and beyond with my two cents. I took it seriously because I saw the opportunity, are you? Read on...

Zoe Connolly

As kids, we are taught that honesty is the best policy, if you lie you won’t be trusted, don’t cry wolf and so on. In other words, we’re taught about transparency. In the recruiting world, transparency harkens back to the same lessons, and is just as important for the hiring manager’s reputation and the property’s reputation. “Transparency” means a number of different things to everyone, but when it comes to the HR field, it’s important to consider all of the potential implications. This article looks at five different places where hotel leadership has the opportunity to be transparent in order to attract and retain top talent. Read on...

Linda Ginac

Technology has been dramatically changing almost every field and industry in the last couple of years and the hospitality one makes no exception. The transformation could be perceived as either positive or negative, but is undoubtedly disruptive. And the customers have no intention to wait for the industry to adapt. On the contrary, they require the best services possible. That is why, hospitality executives and the human resource departments have no choice but to implement efficient software in their operations and keep up with the ever changing environment in the field, keeping their employees engaged and their performance optimal. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

From “human capital management” to less sophisticated terms like “colleagues,” it’s imperative for hotel leaders and HR folks to establish clear lines of sight into how a candidate, an employee and a property can support growth. This can be done through highlighting the importance of local brand, the importance of teams, and the overall approach to guest experiences. The following article aims to explain why certain properties do a better job than others when it comes to retaining guests and employees alike. Read on...

Zoe Connolly

The recruiting process can be very difficult, but it doesn't have to be. Recruiters that leverage successful approaches from other areas of a hotel, such as marketing and sales, can generate value for the industry by limiting the amount of time that roles go unfilled and finding stronger candidates. The easiest way to get the most out of the hiring process is to be thorough and never stop recruiting. In this article we take a look at 4 key ingredients that ensure a maximum return on your recruitment investment. If you employ these techniques in your hiring process you can be guaranteed to bring in stronger employees. Read on...

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Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.