5 Tips in Hotel Recruiting Transparency

By Zoe Connolly Co-Founder & Managing Director, Hospitality Spotlight | October 07, 2018

In nearly every industry, from government to social media, and education to hospitality, the term 'transparency' has gone beyond buzzword, and become part of the lexicon. In the HR world, there's salary transparency, leadership transparency, and yes, transparency has made its way into the hiring process.  
 
When recruiting, the moment a candidate's trust is lost is also the moment their interest in the position is gone. It's even worse if the candidate is hired and then quickly comes to understand that they were mislead. Regardless of the level of the opportunity and the experience of the candidate, they will talk to their network and your organization will have to live with it....whatever that may be. Below are 5 tips that will improve transparency throughout the hiring lifecycle. 

1. Be Transparent About What is Needed Within a Role

Successful team building has a number of components to it. On one hand, there is the obvious goal of finding people who interact well with each other. On the other, it can be about positioning each team member to take advantage of their strengths. It can also be about finding opportunities for growth, and building a funnel of talent to replace individuals who have been promoted. Regardless of the goals, as teams change, so to do the responsibilities for its members.

This places the onus on managers to to be forthcoming for current and prospective employees alike. When the need for a new employee arises, it's likely there is a description laying around from previous recruiting efforts. While this is a great place to start, hotel leadership must ensure that the description accurately reflects the desired position, and edit it to the needs of today. In many instances, the ability to accurately reflect a role will determine the quality of candidates who fit the description.

To build or refine an accurate description, it is important to review the hotel team and any changes that may have occurred since the last round of hiring, as well as discussing the role with current employees. In some instances, this can open up the ability to increase a current employee's responsibilities, while hiring to backfill other components of a role.

Exit interviews are also an important part of understanding the perception of a role, versus the realities. Exit interviews should include questions about day-to-day responsibilities, how a soon-to-be former employee might do differently in a manager's role, and information on how the old description has become obsolete. During exit interviews, hotel leaders may come to realize that as an employee this person took on more responsibilities than required, and probably should have been recognized for their effort. This might change the management approach to the new hire, or change the role itself.

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Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.