Every Guest Brings a Screen

The New Battle for Guest Attention

By Peter Torbet Director, Product Inovation, Acentic | February 21, 2016

Now the smart TV screen is the guest communication and entertainment portal, the hotelier has the chance to reach out and provide a more personalised service. If hoteliers support these services by offering a tiered system of bandwidth and investing in network infrastructure, they will keep their guests more than just connected - they will keep them coming back.

Long gone are the days when the hotel bedroom was dominated by the TV screen and it was the sole focus of attention for the guest, after the mini bar of course.

Screens still dominate our lives, but which screen and when, really depends on who you are and why you are staying in the hotel on that occasion.

Think back to when you last entered a hotel bedroom – what did you do? Reach for the television remote control and watch the local news, unpack your laptop and get connected to the Wi-Fi or check your mobile phone? Guest behaviour is totally driven by need and, of course, habit.

Different demographics follow different patterns of behaviour and if you are travelling for business you want your laptop firing away as quickly as possible to complete your tasks for the day. You may want to connect your laptop to the TV screen to practise a presentation on a larger screen, or stream your music through the TV speakers.

If you have your young family with you, you might want a favorite TV channel straight away to keep everybody happy while you sort out the unpacking. Moody teenagers will want to connect to the Wi-Fi and catch up with Instagram or Snapchat or stream the latest episode of a show over Netflix to while away the time until dinner.
Everybody, but everybody is looking at a screen.

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Coming up in April 2019...

Guest Service: A Culture of YES

In a recent global consumers report, 97% of the participants said that customer service is a major factor in their loyalty to a brand, and 76% said they view customer service as the true test of how much a company values them. And since there is no industry more reliant on customer satisfaction than the hotel industry, managers must be unrelenting in their determination to hire, train and empower the very best people, and to create a culture of exceptional customer service within their organization. Of course, this begins with hiring the right people. There are people who are naturally service-oriented; people who are warm, empathetic, enthusiastic, pleasant, thoughtful and optimistic; people who take pride in their ability to solve problems for the hotel guests they are serving. Then, those same employees must be empowered to solve problems using their own judgment, without having to track down a manager to do it. This is how seamless problem solving and conflict resolution are achieved in guest service. This willingness to empower employees is part of creating a Culture of Yes within an organization.  The goal is to create an environment in which everyone is striving to say “Yes”, rather than figuring out ways to say, “No”. It is essential that this attitude be instilled in all frontline, customer-facing, employees. Finally, in order to ensure that the hotel can generate a consistent level of performance across a wide variety of situations, management must also put in place well-defined systems and standards, and then educate their employees about them. Every employee must be aware of and responsible for every standard that applies in their department. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.