Editorial Board   

Mr. Acton

Scott Acton

CEO & Founder, Forte Specialty Contractors

Building on three generations of creative execution behind some of the globe's most iconic experiential spaces, Scott Acton is no stranger to the unusual in the world of construction. As the CEO and founder of Forte Specialty Contractors in Las Vegas, a construction firm specializing in the hospitality, restaurant, retail, nightlife and entertainment industries, he is known for tackling some of the most difficult and attention-grabbing construction challenges in the industry.

Mr. Acton's entrance into this arena began with a long family history of Disney projects, which, as an entity, is known for creative, unusual experiences requiring innovative construction techniques. Part of developing this skill set for Mr. Acton included attending “Disney University” where he learned the business and leadership skills necessary to build a successful career. Mr. Acton began working for his father at the age of 16, but soon realized his entrepreneurial drive was too strong to just keep working for the family business.

A third-generation craftsman, Mr. Acton worked a variety of odd jobs then followed in the footsteps of his grandfather and father, becoming a notable entrepreneur in his own right. His early work comprises several landmarks across North America, including portions of Knott's Berry Farm, Universal Studios and Disney, showcasing Mr. Acton's affinity to thematic design and construction.

In 2002, Mr. Acton started his own company, Trevi Manufacturing, naming it after the most famous fountain in the world - the Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy. He wanted to combine manufacturing with construction, a marriage not seen within the market. He grew Trevi from a startup to a $12 million company in only two years, resulting in national accolades including being named the U.S. Small Business Administration's “Small Business Person of the Year” for Nevada. His first project in Sin City was Treasure Island's pirate ships, which provide the hotel its iconic presence on the Las Vegas Strip.

Please visit http://fortedesignbuild.com/ for more information.

Mr. Acton can be contacted at 702-697-2000 or scott@fortedesignbuild.com

Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.