Editorial Board   

Mr. Meek

Frank Meek

International Technical & Training Director, Orkin, LLC

“Knowledge is power when it comes to effective pest management.” An industry veteran, Frank Meek has been with Orkin since 1986. In 2003, he was named among the future leaders of the pest management industry in Pest Control Technology magazine's “40 Under 40” ranking. Currently, as the International Technical and Training Director, Mr. Meek provides technical support and training in both sales and service to Orkin's international franchises, helping them grow and develop in their specific markets. As a board-certified entomologist, Mr. Meek teaches Integrated Pest Management principles and can explain how to use all available methodologies to prevent pest infestations in various commercial settings. Mr. Meek has experience in all areas of pest control, enabling him to provide a cross-industry overview of the role that pest management can play in improved safety and sanitation. His common-sense approach and extensive experience make him a natural media resource. Among other pest management topics, he is well versed in best pest management practices in hospitality environments. Mr. Meek is a regular speaker at National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and many international, state and regional pest control association meetings, as well as non pest control industry associations such as the American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES). He has published many articles for the pest control industry trade magazines, as well as major media outlets such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNN, MSNBC and others. Meek has also represented Orkin on national television with appearances on shows such as the NBC Today Show, CNN and ABC News. Mr. Meek writes a monthly column called “Technicalities” for PMP magazine. In 2005, he co-authored the IPM Recommended Practice book for American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES), which has become the standard for providing pest management service to the healthcare industry. In 2010, Mr. Meek authored the chapter on Occasional Invader Pest in the 10th edition of the Mallis Handbook to Pest Control Operations. Previously, Mr. Meek has contributed to HotelExecutive.com on topics ranging from pest management practices for LEED certification to bed bugs and integrating pest management into redesign plans.

Mr. Meek can be contacted at 404-888-2898 or fmeek@rollinscorp.com

Coming up in November 2019...

Architecture & Design: Biophilic Design

The hospitality industry is constantly evolving to meet and exceed guest expectations. As a result, hotels are always on the lookout for new ways to improve the guest experience, and architecture and design is an essential part of this equation. Bold design is often the most effective way to make an exceptional first impression - an impression guests use to distinguish between brands. One design trend that is being embraced worldwide has become known as "Biophilic Design." Biophilic design is based on the concept of biophilia, which is the theory that human beings have an innate tendency to seek out nature, natural elements, and natural forms. Biophilic design is more than hotels simply adding a surplus of plants; it involves incorporating specific design elements into a hotel in order to imbue it with a sense of wellness and well-being. Some of those elements include exposure to natural lighting; views of nature and rooms with a view; natural architectural patterns; salvaged or reclaimed woods of all types; reclaimed metals; sustainably sourced stone; living green walls and vertical gardens; and direct and indirect exposure to nature. Hotels that have incorporated biophilic design into their properties are reaping the benefits associated with this trend including reduced stress responses, better air quality, lower energy costs, and more positive guest reviews. Biophilic design has also been shown to improve guest moods and to satisfy consumer demand for environmental responsibility. Savvy hotel owners and managers are aware that nature-inspired elements enhance their guests' comfort and well-being, which is why this trend is becoming so prevalent. Biophilic design is just one topic in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.